Lost 5.5 “This Place Is Death”

Perhaps the best part of tonight’s episode, for me, was the implied tragic moment referrenced shortly before Charlotte dies. At some point in his personal future but in the Island’s past, Dan Farraday, the very man who explained to everyone else that it’s impossible to change the past, will see a young Charlotte and not be able to stop himself from pleading with her to never come back to the Island, so that she won’t die. But he will know, even as he is doing it, that he fails, because he’s already lived through his own failure to save her.

And perhaps the most intriguing part of tonight’s episode is the question of what the Smoke Monster does to people that it doesn’t kill. Is it the same thing that happens to the actual dead bodies? Had Rousseau’s crew entered the same state of existence as Christian Shephard? Presumbly the temple that the Monster pulled the one scientist into is the same temple that Ben had Richard take the Others to when he knew the Freighter Folks were coming.

I loved Ben’s little freakout about how much he’s done for the O6 and how ungrateful they are. It was a nice little character moment for Michael Emerson.

I’m guessing that when we see Locke tracking down the O6 next week, he’s going to be back in wheel chair again because of those broken legs.

So when the Monster comes out of the temple to grab the one French guy, it took on a little more of a shape than it usually has. I thought it looked vaguely like a bear. Did anyone else notice that, and if so, what did you think it looked like?

Advertisements

About John Carr

Gamer, comic guy, office drone.

Posted on February 11, 2009, in Lost. Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. So many things have happened to John legs since he could miraculously walk again after the crash. I think that the fate of him in the wheelchair is too much to change. In some fashion or another he will be crippled again.. even when the last episode rolls and the passengers are on Flight 815 that does not crash this time ( yes I am still sticking to that)

  2. “At some point in his personal future but in the Island’s past, Dan Farraday, the very man who explained to everyone else that it’s impossible to change the past, will see a young Charlotte and not be able to stop himself from pleading with her to never come back to the Island, so that she won’t die. But he will know, even as he is doing it, that he fails, because he’s already lived through his own failure to save her.”

    This is so clearly the correct and most aesthetically pleasing interpretation of that scene, yet I’ve heard so many fan theories speculating on what happens regarding Farraday and child-Charlotte and its implications for changing things and creating paradoxes. I’m generally not against fan speculation, but this time it’s annoyingly myopic.

    I’m guessing we’ll eventually see the scene where Farraday confronts child-Charlotte, but I’d prefer that it only be hinted at the way it was in this episode. What beautiful tragedy.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: